Archives for category: Game Review

It’s been a while since I’ve enjoyed a hard-core game marathon, the sort where you sit down to play with the morning’s coffee, then look up a while later to discover that the day has gone by, you’ve skipped lunch, and pretty much nothing else is going to be accomplished for the day.  But this week, as I enjoyed the between-term break provided by my generous and magnanimous employer, I wasted three days playing Betrayer start to finish.

Betrayer is the first game from the new studio Blackpowder Games, which is composed of several Monolith veterans – Monolith being the developer behind F.E.A.R. and No One Lives Forever and various other well-remembered games from the Golden Age of the PC FPS.  I first heard about this game on episode 3 of Tone Control, a podcast on the Idle Thumbs network that is a series of interviews with game developers about their careers and the process of making video games.  The developer in this case was Craig Hubbard, and towards the end he discussed this game.  It’s been on Early Access for a bit, but I got the game on a whim when I saw the full release announcement on Steam. 

To steal a phrase from Rock Paper Shotgun, here’s what I think.

Betrayer keeps you in the dark, literally and figuratively.

Literally speaking, the game’s default graphics mode is black and white, with the occasional splash of red.  Furthermore, nearly half the time you’re in the “dark world,” which is quite literally dark and foggy and definitely tilted towards the black end of the black and white spectrum.  Figuratively speaking, the game tells you absolutely nothing about its fundamental mechanics or about the story.  I didn’t figure out how to use one of the most critical game mechanics until the fourth map stage, and when I got around to going back to early stages with that knowledge in hand, I was able to unearth tons of stuff which I’d simply bypassed the first time through.  Look to the spoilers section at the end for my discussion of this.

At the same time, Betrayer makes no secret about being a serious First-Person shooter.  This is clear from the opening scenes, where you learn to smash open crates with a COD-style super-fast melee attack and then find the weapon store and your first “real” weapon, the longbow.  Yes, that’s right, a longbow.  This is a serious first-person shooter where you’ll spend most of the game shooting arrows, because your only guns are single-shot black powder muskets and pistols which take forever to reload.

This is the split-personality of Betrayer – serious shooter mechanics of the strangest sort versus challenging tactical situations, on the one hand, and a grab bag of exploration, puzzle, investigation, and story mechanics on the other.  It’s the oddest mix I’ve run into in a long time, and while utterly captivating, it has its share of problems.

So, the story.  You wash up on the coast, mysterious protagonist, looking for . . . something.  An English colony, one would presume, given the remains of an English colony you find.  It’s not clear at first what’s going on – and as one advances, things become even more murky.  You meet nobody living, except, maybe, a mysterious woman in red.  She’s looking for her sister, but cannot remember her own name, or much of anything.  Is she really alive, or just another spirit in another form?  Are you even really alive, or just another wraith, like the other wraiths and specters and lost souls you meet in the dark world?

Ring the bell, and the world changes, from the “light” world, which does not seem quite right, to the “dark” world, which is very definitely the world of the dead.  In the world of the dead are skeletal and spectral enemies, who are just as vulnerable to musket and arrow as are the Spaniards and Natives you fight in the light world.  Also, there are wraiths, glowing ghosts who are actually friendly and communicative.  You help them piece together the events of their last days, usually by going out into the world and finding objects or interviewing lost souls, and helping them attain a degree of closure in their after-life.

Finding things is not easy, because you’re thrown into a series of very large and fairly open maps, where you are free to wander through the forest at great length.  One can be methodical, and through brute force alone scour the maps for all relevant clues, but the game provides you with the oddest of hint mechanics – and of course, it doesn’t explain it at all.

Why are you able to switch between these worlds?  The woman in red has no answers.  Indeed, she openly mocks you and your craziness, as she can’t see the dark world at all, nor does she see any of the enemies you face.  It’s all quite unnerving – you’re not sure who she is, or who you are, but it’s pretty clear that the final answer is not going to be all that simple, or pretty.

Solving puzzles means traveling around the world, and traveling around the world means combat.  There are lots of enemies in the colonial Americas, be they zombie-esque Spaniards (their presence is explained, sort of, but their bestial nature is not), Native warriors (who are on fire), skeletons, or wraiths.  The Spanish are a particular challenge, as much of the game is comprised of clearing them out of key towns or outposts.  There are a LOT of Spaniards guarding the game’s main areas, and they are quite tough.  Given your weaponry, it’s not a good idea to charge straight in.  Instead, you need to sneak up on the Spanish sentries, one by one, and knock them out with assassin-style headshots from your bow.  Problem is, it’s HARD to hit them in the head properly, and one false hit, and the whole contingent of guards is on your case.  Sometimes you can run away and hide, but more often than not they’ll hunt you down and shoot you to death.

When this happens, it becomes clear just how strong the influence of Dark Souls has been on the game’s basic design.  Whenever you die, the world and its enemies re-spawn.  Clear out an entire area, and it stays clear – that’s one little mercy the game provides, and after opening up an area in this fashion you’ll typically find all kinds of new stuff to investigate.  Should you fail in clearing out a new zone, though, you’ll have to start from scratch, and try again and again until you manage to kill every single Spaniard guarding your target area.  Succeed, and you’re rewarded with a clear audio cue and in-game message, “ZONE X UNLOCKED.”  This forces you to master the game’s stealth mechanics, which are quite forgiving, and it forces you to learn the bow.  It also forces you to get 10 to 15 successful headshots with your bow in a row, which is no easy accomplishment.  Betrayer is serious about giving you some serious FPS challenges.

After you figure out the nature of the challenges in both the Light World and the Dark World, the game falls into a bit of a rhythm.   Enter a new zone, find the key areas, clear out the Spaniards.  Find the bell, then enter the dark world.  Meet the wraiths and lost souls, look for clues, and clear out the evil forces.  Move to next zone, repeat.

I loved it.  I love exploring large open worlds, and discovering everything in them, wondering if I’ve found everything I need, and hitting the wall of incomprehension now and again.  There were moments where I was stuck, wondering if I’d missed something earlier (thanks Sierra games!), or wondering if I had failed to grasp some basic game mechanic – but soon enough, I figured out what I needed to know, and with that mastery, was able to move forward in a much more assured and competent manner.  It was awesome.

For anyone who enjoyed the moments of total incomprehension in Dark Souls, AND enjoys some serious if unconventional FPS challenges, this game is highly recommended.

Spolier-ey nitpicks below.  You don’t have to look!

 

 

 

 

 

 

In all honesty, the game’s main plot is a mess.  Vengeful spirit, ancient Indian burial ground, first-contact difficulties, asshole boss – it’s all there, but it just doesn’t make sense!  Where did Tabitha’s super-death powers really come from, and how on Earth did she turn into such a super-destroyer?  As if every young woman dealt a shit hand in life gets massive destructive super powers!  Then again, what exactly was the relationship of the woman in Red to the whole set of events?  Did she turn her sister into this death-dealing mega blight?  Was she merely the tool of the ancient evil powers of the woods, alluded to on several occasions?  Who knows.  None of it was made clear in the middle, and at the end, the developers threw a massive sucker punch at the player, but didn’t give them time to figure out its meaning.  Seriously, wtf was the meaning of that last scene?

Furthermore, what was the significance, if any, of all the little decisions the player made through the game?  Did any of those gifts to the Woman in Red matter? How? Why?  Did it matter whether you consigned the wraiths to Torment or to Peace?  I made judgements of each person on a case by case basis, forgiving most but condemning the worst of the worse – but did it matter at all?  I don’t know.

Don’t get me wrong – the fact that I’m left with all these questions is a sign of success.  I care enough to wonder, meaning the developers did most of their job.  However, it’s a big problem with games as a medium in this particular historical moment that players can never tell how much this sort of end-game confusion is a result of poor design (nobody could get it because it’s just stupid), the player missing something (I failed to notice the scrollwork in the background which tied it all together, or something), the player not being on the same wavelength as the developer (expecting something so different from what the developer intended that the final reveal was incomprehensible), deliberate creative decisions (obscure for the sake of being artistic), or a failure to 100% the game (if you’d read the secret note hidden under a rock in the first zone, you’d totally understand everything).  The author of a book does not have this problem – if the reader doesn’t “get” the book, it’s either because the author sucks, or the reader didn’t get it.  With games, you have that ugly middle ground to worry about – maybe I didn’t do all the busy work, and if I had, I’d get the REAL ending.  I don’t know what the situation with Betrayer is, and it kind of bugs me.

All that said, the biggest let down in the game was discovering that the all of the little goody piles buried under rocks were just money, weapons, or charms.  I was CERTAIN that when I went back and unearthed all those little rock piles, there would be tons of story-related goodness, and I’d really start to understand what was going on in a much deeper and more comprehensive manner.  Finding 200 coins or a Warrior’s Shortbow was a massive disappointment, because by that point in the game I didn’t CARE about the FPS challenges nearly as much as I cared about the story and the world.  Thus, finding FPS bonuses was nice, I guess, but it was not at all what I was really looking for.

On the other hand, one of the most surprisingly cool elements was the use of sound cues as a primary navigational aid.  There’s a LISTEN command, which plays a sound effect.  This sound effect is rendered in Stereo, so you can use it to turn towards a target, and it gets louder as you get closer to a target.  You don’t really know what the sound is leading you towards, but it gives you a guide to help find MOST of the important things in both the Light and the Dark worlds.  I didn’t figure out how these worked until the third or fourth map zone, but once I did they were absolutely wonderful, especially in the Dark World.  It was awesome to figure this out for myself, but on the other hand, I wonder how many people may NEVER figure out how useful these sound-cues are, and thus suffer horribly from the difficult of finding things in the forest.

Wow.

I loved it.  I played the majority of the game through in a single sitting – fittingly enough, while a major snowstorm raged outside.  Steam says it took me 16 hours, but I hardly noticed – until the end.  More on that later.

Brilliant atmosphere, tough decisions, and interesting tactical gameplay – that’s The Banner Saga for you.

This game nails the dark, apocalyptic, stoic feel of Viking mythology beautifully.  It’s the end of the world, and we’re all screwed, but until we die we’ve nothing to do but make it a fight.  A good chunk of the game is spent guiding a train of refugees across the land, and the game’s finale has you fighting to hold out as a doomed town of the abandoned poor is besieged by an immense army of unknowable stone people led by an unkillable Immortal.  Yet the stone people somehow gained my sympathy as well.  The art is brilliant across the board, so much so that even these relentless and mysterious enemies called out across the screen, for their humanity to be recognized despite it all – and especially so for their leader, Bellower.  His signature cry of rage was so beautifully animated that it looked as much a wail of despair as a terrifying blast of sound, and the game left me wondering about the tragic, doomed mission that led this Sundr to his ultimate defeat.

This game also beautifully struck the balance between the critical importance of the Hero, and the power of the mass.  In the story, the great Heroes and Sundr were the driving force behind all events.  Rook guiding his refugees to, if not safety, than at least a less dangerous place.  Hakon guided by destiny to an enemy stronghold, against all reason and good judgement.  Eyvind, striding forth to hold back the Stonsinger on the bridge.  Iver, standing up to his King to lead the remnants of his race away from a doomed last stand.  And Bellower, leading his people away from inexplicable danger towards the ancient enemy that had defeated them time and time again.  Yet between these moments, the game made you truly responsible for the survival of your people, in the most mundane ways possible.  Settling disputes, providing food, finding safe places to rest, and choosing the best path from several bad options – all these things came to seem just as important as the great confrontations of the heroes.  And, on occasion, doing it well might just get you a reward – a new Hero for the battles, better morale, or a special item.  From the many come the strength of the great.

But this is not a game for the Min/Maxer or the optimizer.  You only have one go at any of the choices in the game, and there’s little to indicate what the ultimate effect will be.  For someone who is willing to jump into this as a role-playing experience, and who buys the characters and the story, this leads to an incredible level of connection and a feeling of responsibility.  However, for someone who wants to play this as a game, learn the system, and find the “best” outcome, I can see how this would be an incredibly offputting experience.  I think I did pretty well, all in all, but there were some nasty sacrifices I made along the way, and I walked myself into a couple of really bad situations.  I might have been able to save Egil, whose Super Shield class I remembered and loved from when I played Banner Saga Factions last year.  I sent Mogyr, my favorite Varl warrior in the game, off to his death.  I stuck around a flooding town waiting for someone to arrive, and ended up starving on the road with nothing to show for it.  And at the end, I sacrificed poor Allette to her own youthful confidence, giving her a true Hero’s Death but breaking poor Rook in the process.  Despite it all, I never even considered re-loading and re-selecting, because I was immersed in the experience, and any other choice would have felt wrong.

But if the overworld game is about making the choice that feels right to you, and dealing with the consequences as they fall, then the tactical part of the game is where the optimizer has a chance to shine.  The tactical battle system in The Banner Saga involves very little luck, and involves a lot of prediction.  Keeping track of the turn order, knowing who will attack next and what they can do, predicting where the enemy will move and anticipating the damage that will cause – these skills are critical to playing the game well.  It’s a fun battle system.  I enjoyed it quite a bit when I played the MOBA version last year, Banner Saga – Factions, and the fights never got old in the full game.  My favorite classes were the Varl Strongarm and the Spearman, though Rook the Hunter was also incredibly useful thanks to his versatility.  Spearmen were great at hunting down Slingers, thanks to their Impale move and the fact that the Slingers automatically move 3 spaces after being hit, and in combination with the Strongarm they were great at weakening the big guys with an Impale/Battering Ram combo.  I’m sure there were totally different ways to play the game, and that other players would like very different Heroes.

As much as I loved it, the Banner Saga is not a game which I can recommend unreservedly to any gamer.  While the atmosphere and art is incredibly appealing, the two halves of the gameplay are so totally different in their demands and their rewards that many gamers will walk away with very conflicted feelings.  I’m not surprised that my various trusted sources of gaming wisdom and judgement have had distinctly divided opinions of the game.  Rock, Paper, Shotgun came away feeling that the tactical battles were shoehorned into the game in an awkward manner that detracted from the overall sense of immersion, despite loving the game in a general way.  On Episode 248 of Three Moves Ahead, the panel (Rob Zacne, Troy Goodfellow, and Danielle Riendeau from Polygon) takes the game to task for its unpredictable and totally scripted decisions, and how there’s no way to ever guess or predict what will happen.  Also, kudos to them for mentioning a distant soul-brother to The Banner Saga, King of Dragon Pass, a game that I dearly loved on its original PC release.  The guys on the Gamers with Jobs Conference Call Episode 381 generally enjoyed the game, but felt that all the talking detracted from the wonderful atmosphere and the actual gameplay.

But I love this game, absolutely and without qualifications.

I completed a game of XCOM -Enemy Within last night, so I figure it’s time to try and wrap up my thoughts on the game.

When I finished the Temple Run mission, and watched my heroic survivor Grace Kelly (my first support, sole survivor from my starting squad, crack shot with the carbine, and possessor of the cutest Italian dialog) pilot the alien mothership to its end, I felt relived as much as anything.  Finally, it was done.  Others have commented on the late-game slog in XCOM, when your squad is powerful enough that anything other than a total tactical fuck-up is a piece of cake.  I was feeling it, but I was also committed to the mission this time.  I’d played XCOM Enemy Unknown to the end, but lost my whole team in the final room due to mind-control.  I wasn’t playing on Iron Man, but I still hadn’t felt like replaying that whole mission AGAIN, especially since I didn’t think my squad would be able to deal with the 3 Etherians very well.  I uninstalled the game, to make my decision stick.  This time, though . . . it would be different.

The biggest differences were in my squad, and the options I had at my disposal.  The most important of these was my MEC.  The MEC kicks ass, and that’s all there is to it.   I ran with a single MEC trooper, and she was absolutely deadly.  I got the fist, the grenades, the EMP, and the Particle Cannon, and she just killed everything.  Seriously, when my MEC showed up the enemy just died, so much so such that my MEC trooper was seriously hurt only twice in the entire game – once by double Mechtoids at long range, and once in the Temple Run by the double Sectopods.  My MEC trooper had originally been a sniper, and a rather crappy sniper at that.  I already had two better snipers, and I was tired of old Gobuleva always missing her damn shots.  So, off with her limbs.  Gobuleva Mk. II walked right into a lv. 2 MEC with a Railgun, as I was pretty slow in getting my MELD facilities up and running.  From that point on, the game changed.  MECa-Gobuleva killed pretty much anything in one hit.  Pretty soon, MECa-Gobuleva got the ability to fire twice in a round – now that’s two kills a turn.  MECa-Gobuleva could get up on building roofs easily, could fire grenades beyond line of sight, was faster than my other soldiers and thus a killer scout, and was protected from high-damage crits by various damage reducing abilities. MECa-Gobuleva ran up and punched things to death, even Mechtoids.  MECa-Gobuleva ran out and disabled both Sectopods with EMP, allowing my other troops to take them out before they recovered.  MECa-Gobuleva punched the final Etherian to death.  MECa-Gobuleva was bad-ass.

In fact, MECa-Gobuleva kinda broke the game.  Even on classic, my squad just had too much firepower for the aliens.  The only situations that gave me pause in the mid or late game were the occasions I was faced with double-Sectopods, because they had so damn many hit points.  I wish I’d realized the real power of the EMP earlier, because with that ability even double-Sectopods aren’t all that dangerous.

Enemy Within gives your operatives so much new firepower, yet adds so little to the alien aresnal.  Seekers are cool, in theory.  I even lost a trooper to them, a squaddie who was already badly hurt.  My heroic support, Grace Kelly, stayed behind lines on overwatch quite often just to deal with them.  Mechtoids are great, a little tougher and nastier than Cyberdisks, and always deployed with Sectoid support.  The problem is that the game rarely throws enough at you at any one point to really make a high-level squad sweat, and if you play smart you’re not going to trigger too many enemies at one time.  Sure, on Classic they will advance up on you here and there – but it’s never quite enough.  Most enemy groups were dispatched the turn they were revealed, often before they even had a chance to fire.

The game really shined early on, before I got my MEC – when it was XCOM Enemy Unknown, more or less.  There were swarms of enemies, more than it felt like I could handle, and the outcome of each attack was critical.  One very early mission, before I even had lasers, my squad of 5 was confronted by 16 or more Sectoids.  That was tough.  The Council Mission in Newfoundland, versus the endless waves of Chrysalids – that was fun.  The last Terror mission I fought before my MEC came on line, with 9 Chrysalids and two Cyberdisks, was the hardest mission I played – and replayed, and replayed, and replayed.  As you get the new MELD tech online, though, the balance really shifts in your favor, in a way that the Alien forces just can’t counter.

I wanted to like the Gene mods, but when it comes down to it there was only one that really mattered at all – Neural Dampening.  I put that one on all my guys, and it payed off big time when the Etherians showed up.  I played around with reactive pupils, which helped occasionally, a little, I guess.  I put jumpy-legs on a few others.  That was kinda nice, I guess.  Double-Heart is nice in theory, but it’s only worth paying for it on high-level soldiers, and high-level soldiers usually survive critical hits and can be stabilized or revived.  I suppose if you’re playing on Iron Man it’s more useful, when you really have to scrape and claw to turn around even the worst situations and avoid a TPK.

But in the end, I only wanted to run one MEC, and I didn’t wanna bother with most gene mods, so I ended up with a great big pile of unused MELD at the end.

In a number of ways, the designers tried to force players to move a bit more.  I gather many XCOM players used very slow, very cautious tactics to prevent danger and maximize long-range sniper kills.  I was never that kind of player, and found it very easy to deal with the timed missions.  I always want to be moving forward anyway, and the enemies on those maps rarely spawned in terribly dangerous spots.  I’d always be able to kill them off the very next turn, and move on.  In fact, the only one that was even close was the Newfoundland Chrysalid mission, and that wasn’t a problem with getting back to the ship, but rather getting onto the boat and back off without losing anyone to the endlessly spawning Chrysalids.

My aggressive playstyle really fit the EXALT missions.  I found that if I was quick in moving up to the target zones on the very first turn, those missions were never terribly hard.  The EXALT forces would spawn and flank from all directions, but if I was already in a good position it was easy to deal with them – often as they spawned.  They were of average difficulty at first – as I already outgunned them by the time they first showed up.  When I got my MEC and my first few plasma weapons, EXALT became a joke.  It was like playing whack-a-mole in a shooting gallery.  Due to the speed at which you get EXALT data, I wasn’t able to smash their base until I was almost done with the game, but that final mission was a fun romp.  These guys were annoying pests, and I finally got the chance to smash them with an iron fist.  The mission was pathetically easy, but very fun.

However, one thing must be said.  I played with the ability roulette option activated, and this gave me a big, BIG advantage.  I had an assault with Field Medic, my sniper had Revive, and my Support had Saviour.  Grace Kelly, and my Heavy, and one of my Assaults – they all had Bulletstorm.  Enemy Within gives you extra tools to play around with, sure – but Ability Roulette makes things even sillier.

Overall?  It was more XCOM, so that was cool.  I was happy to play it again, just to see all the new stuff.  I enjoyed killing stuff with the MEC, even as I realized it was making everything way too easy.  I played it consistently for many hours, which is a positive vote all on its own.

Highlights of the Game

The Newfoundland Chrysalid mission.  That was really cool.  It shows up early, when Chrysalids are seriously dangerous.  It allows you to move up slowly, but then forces you to make a dangerous dash past their spawn point – and then to dash back, but this time with a time limit.

The second mission from the Slingshot DLC, where you have to advance along the train.  That showed up in my second month, and dealing with those Thin Men and Mutons despite the awkward angles and the difficult cover was a lot of fun.

The early Terror Attacks which heavily feature Chrysalids.  I feel a strong responsibility to save civilians from zombification, which forces me to move up much more dangerously than I would otherwise, as my units are still pretty vulnerable and are lacking in serious firepower.

The different special animations when you punch enemies to death with the MEC.  I only saw the Mechtoid and Berzerker animation, but I wonder if there’s one for the Sectopod or the Cyberdisk.  There really ought to be one for an Etherian.

Fighting Sectopods.  Those buggers are tough.  They always get reaction fire, they can use indirect fire to mangle your units that hide out of sight or in strong cover, and their double-shot fusion cannon is dangerous even to the toughest soldiers.  I always had the firepower to deal with them, but it was still a tense and challenging experience.

Finally getting to use psychic powers at the end of the game, long after it really mattered.  I got perverse enjoyment from killing weakened enemies with Mindfray, and from finishing off the two final Muton Elite in the last room of the Temple Run with a Mind Rift.

Super Laser Racer is a fun little game I discovered years ago.  It’s a top-down racer with clean, simple vector graphics and a deep simulation of speed and momentum. There are also a fair number of tracks, and the cars handle in meaningfully different ways.  It’s a great way to while away 20 minutes at a time, and presents some genuine challenge.

Why I like it

  • It’s a bare-bones racing game, where momentum really matters.
  • The simple vector-graphics don’t distract me with annoying or implausible backstory.  Instead, it contextualizes the somewhat unreal physics and handling.
  • There are weapons and powerups, but they are not overwhelming.  Good driving easily beats lucky powerups.
  • The techno soundtrack is pretty fun.